Netflix Heads Into Showdown With Slowing Subscriber Growth

MICHAEL LIEDTKE / AP SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Netflix’s subscriber growth is bogging down even before the leading video streaming service confronts high-powered threats from Apple and Walt Disney Co. The latest sign of the challenges the company is facing emerged Wednesday with the release of its third-quarter results. The numbers provided further evidence that Netflix’s salad days may be over, particularly in the U.S., where most households that want its 12-year-old streaming service already have it. Netflix added 6.8 million subscribers worldwide from July through September, below the 7 million customers forecast by the Los Gatos, California, company. Just … Continue reading Netflix Heads Into Showdown With Slowing Subscriber Growth

Police and Protesters Clash in Catalonia for a Third Consecutive Night

JOSEPH WILSON / AP BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — Rioting raged in Barcelona and several other Catalan towns for a third straight night Wednesday, with police fighting running street battles with protesters angered by lengthy prison sentences for nine leaders of the wealthy region’s drive for independence from Spain. Tens of thousands of protesters faced off against police in Barcelona. Some set up flaming barricades in the streets, torching cars and trash cans. They chanted, “The streets will always be ours!” Catalan police said protesters threw gasoline bombs, stones, bottles and firecrackers at them. Violence erupted in Catalonia after Spain’s Supreme … Continue reading Police and Protesters Clash in Catalonia for a Third Consecutive Night

Litany of Defeat: Trump Defends Rising Costs of “Strategically Brilliant” Mideast Retreat

W.J. Hennigan Declaring his abrupt decision to withdraw U.S. troops in northern Syria “strategically brilliant,” President Donald Trump Wednesday scrambled to contain the damage from what outraged Republicans and Democrats said was an expanding litany of losses for American national security interests in the region. Trump welcomed Russia’s rapid takeover of American positions in the region. He said that the Kurds, long Washington’s ally against ISIS, were “no angels” and that some were in fact worse terrorists than ISIS itself. And he described mounting violence that has killed scores of civilians and has included multiple reports of war crimes, as … Continue reading Litany of Defeat: Trump Defends Rising Costs of “Strategically Brilliant” Mideast Retreat

California’s Outages Show How Climate Change and Corporate Accountability Are Entangled

Justin Worland and Lissandra Villa After millions of people in California were left in the dark last week when Pacific Gas & Electric, the giant utility company that provides service to much of the state, preventatively shut off power to avoid possible wildfires, the conversation quickly turned political. Democrats described PG&E’s actions as the result of rampant corporate greed that, they argued, kept the company from preparing for extreme weather associated with climate change. “Californians should not pay the price for decades of PG&E’s greed and neglect,” said California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Twitter. “PG&E must be held to account.” … Continue reading California’s Outages Show How Climate Change and Corporate Accountability Are Entangled

Some Democrats Want to Make the Supreme Court Bigger. Here’s the History of Court Packing

Olivia B. Waxman One of the issues that the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates are generally split on is whether it could potentially be a good idea to add Justices to the U.S. Supreme Court or to nix justices’ life-long terms. The subject came up directly at the Democratic primary debate on Tuesday night in the Columbus, Ohio, suburb of Westerville. Moderator Erin Burnett from CNN asked former Vice President Joe Biden about whether he would try to add Justices to the Supreme Court “to protect women’s reproductive rights” if Roe v. Wade is overturned. Biden reiterated his opposition to what’s … Continue reading Some Democrats Want to Make the Supreme Court Bigger. Here’s the History of Court Packing

Why the UAW’s Deal With General Motors Is Unlikely to Give Workers What They Really Want

Tara Law The United Auto Workers Union has reached a tentative agreement with General Motors to end the longest national strike involving the company in decades. But even if autoworkers vote to accept the proposal—which isn’t certain—it may be challenging for them to get some of the concessions they want most, experts say. In addition to addressing concerns about wages and benefits, the strike is about getting assurances that unionized workers in the United States will continue to have a future at the company. Jobs are increasingly being given to temporary employees who face a difficult road to becoming permanent—or … Continue reading Why the UAW’s Deal With General Motors Is Unlikely to Give Workers What They Really Want

How to Rethink Whistleblowing for Today’s Post-Truth World

Martin Bright The emergence of a second whistleblower claiming first-hand knowledge of President Donald’s Trump’s dealings with Ukraine is a highly unusual development, not least because those responsible for leaking intelligence information usually act alone. From Daniel Ellsberg’s disclosure of the Pentagon Papers through to Edward Snowden himself, the mythology that grows up around whistleblower is built upon the idea that these are either exceptionally moral individuals or crazy, narcissistic loners. Sometimes both. In the search for evidence that Trump put pressure on the Ukrainian President to investigate one of his political rivals, Joe Biden, it will clearly help if … Continue reading How to Rethink Whistleblowing for Today’s Post-Truth World